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Can’t we all just get along?! Steps to minimize conflict among siblings

As a parent, you were likely not prepared for your kiddos to be out of school a week earlier than expected—not to mention the entire month of April. With playdates out of the question, libraries closed, rainy days, and other activities canceled, your family is likely spending A LOT of time at home together. However, …

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In The Moment: Being a More Present Parent

Our children are connected and attached to us! Sometimes that attachment is overwhelming and it seems like they just want our attention all the time. Whether it’s an infant’s cry, your older son endlessly talking about Minecraft, or your toddler needing extra snuggles at the end of a long day,  it’s built into their DNA—and …

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Knowing The Signs of ADHD

This week, the Triple P Team offers their tips for recognizing the signs of ADHD, as well as ways to help children succeed.   It’s not uncommon for elementary school-aged children to get restless or bored easily; squirm around in their chair at school; or make silly noises at inappropriate times. But when a child …

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Quality over Quantity: How to improve the time and attention you give to your children

Everyone at every age needs attention! It feels good when someone focuses his or her full attention on you. Being attentive also feels good to your infant or toddler (and older children). For children, getting attention is even more important than for adults. Children need attention in order to grow, develop self-esteem and a positive …

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Ability to Focus Attention Develops as Brain Develops (Part 2 of 2)

At the University of Oregon’s Brain Development Laboratory, we study attention in children as young as 3 by measuring the brain’s response to sounds as we ask children to shift their “spotlight” of attention from one side to the other. Shifting this spotlight of attention markedly changes the brain’s response to events in the environment – the brain produces a response to an attended stimulus that is twice as large as the response when it is unattended, and this boost occurs within 1/10 of a second! The ability to focus attention is critical in lifelong learning. We have shown that this enhanced brain response is not present in some young children who are at-risk for academic problems.

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